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L'autrier jost' una sebissa
Trobei pastora mestissa,
De joi e de sen massissa,
Si cum filla de vilana,
Cap' e gonel' e pelissa
Vest e camiza treslissa
Sotlars e causas de lana.

Ves lieis vinc per la planissa.
Toza, fi·m ieu, res faitissa,
Dol ai car lo freitz vos fissa.
--Seigner, so·m dis la vilana,
Merce Dieu e ma noirissa,
Pauc m'o pretz si·l vens m'erissa,
Qu'alegreta sui e sana.

--Toza, fi·m ieu, cauza pia,
Destors me sui de la via
Per far a vos compaignia!
Quar aitals toza vilana
No deu ses pareill paria
Pastorgar tanta bestia
En aital terra, soldana.

--Don, fetz ela, qui que·m sia,
Ben conosc sen e folia!
La vostra pareillaria,
Seigner, so·m dis la vilana,
Lai on se tang si s'estia,
Que tals la cuid' en bailia
Tener, no·n a mas l'ufana.

--Toza de gentil afaire,
Cavaliers fon vostre paire
Que·us engenret en la maire,
Car fon corteza vilana.
Con plus vos gart, m'etz belaire,
E per vostre joi m'esclaire,
Si·m fossetz un pauc humana

--Don, tot mon ling e mon aire
Vei revertir e retraire
Al vezoig et a l'araire,
Seigner, so·m dis la vilana!
Mas tals se fai cavalgaire
C'atrestal deuria faire
Los seis jorns de la setmana.

--Toza, fi·m ieu, gentils fada,
Vos adastret, quam fos nada,
D'una beutat esmerada
Sobre tot' autra vilana!
E seria·us ben doblada,
Si·m vezi' una vegada,
Sobira e vos sotrana.

--Seigner, tan m'avetz lauzada,
Que tota·n sui enojada!
Pois en pretz m'avetz levada,
Seigner, so·m dis la vilana,
Per so n'auretz per soudada
Al partir : bada, fols, bada,
E la muz'a meliana.

--Toz', estraing cor e salvatge
Adomesg' om per uzatge.
Ben conosc al trespassatge
Qu'ab aital toza vilana
Pot hom far ric compaignatge
Ab amistat de coratge,
Si l'us l'autre non engana.

--Don, hom coitatz de follatge
Jur' e pliu e promet gatge:
Si·m fariatz homenatge,
Seigner, so·m dis la vilana!
Mas ieu, per un pauc d'intratge,
Non vuoil ges mon piucellatge,
Camjar per nom de putana.

--Toza, tota creatura
Revertis a sa natura:
Pareillar pareilladura
Devem, ieu e vos, vilana,
A l'abric lonc la pastura,
Car plus n'estaretz segura
Per far la cauza doussana.

--Don, oc! mas segon dreitura
Cerca fols sa follatura,
Cortes cortez' aventura,
E·il vilans ab la vilana!
En tal loc fai sens fraitura
On hom non garda mezura,
So ditz la gens anciana.

--Toza, de vostra figura
Non vi autra plus tafura
Ni de son cor plus trefana.

--Don, lo cavecs vos ahura,
Que tals bad' en la peintura
Qu'autre n'espera la mana.

The other day, by a hedge,
I found a half-caste shepherdess,
full of joy and common sense,
just like the daughter of a peasant.
A cape, a jerkin, and a fur-lined gown,
she wore, and a mesh shirt,
shoes and woollen stockings.

I walked towards her through the plain.
"Girl, I said, enchanted being,
I am very sorry that the cold stings you."
"Sir, said the peasant,
thanks to god and my nurse,
I care little if the wind dishevels me,
for I am happy and healthy."

"Girl, said I, charming thing,
I turned away from my path
to keep you company;
for a young peasant such as you
should not, without an equal companion,
herd so much cattle,
in a place like this, alone."

"Sir, said she, whatever I may be,
I can tell sense from folly.
Keep your acquaintance,
Lord", said the peasant,
"for those it suits,
because some think they keep
[one] in thrall, who shouldn't even dream of it."

"Girl of noble standing,
your father was a knight,
and the mother he begot you with
was a noble peasant.
The more I look at you, the more I find you beautiful
and your joy cheers me up.
If you only were a little more human towards me..."

"Sir, all my lineage and my family,
as far as I know, goes back
to the spade and plough,
Lord", said the peasant,
"but some make knights of themselves
who should do the same
six days out of a week."

"Girl, said I, a kind fairy
endowed you, when you were born,
with a supreme beauty,
greater than any other peasant's;
and you would be doubly nice
if, for once, you were my neighbour,
you beneath, and I above."

"Sir, you have praised me so much
that I've gotten bored.
Since you have extolled my virtue,
Lord", said the peasant,
"you'll have this wage
when you leave: 'Beware, fool, beware!'
and having wasted the afternoon."

"Girl, an aloof and cruel heart
is tamed by use,
and I know, by this exchange,
that, of such a peasant girl,
one can make a prized companion
with hearts joined in friendship,
provided that one doesn't deceive the other."

"Sire, a man beset by folly
swears, pledges and promises gages:
thus would you pay me homage,
Lord," said the peasant,
"but, in exchange for a small reward,
I do not want to trade
my girlhood for the title of whore."

"Girl, every creature
goes back to its own kind:
form a matching pair
we must, me and you, peasant,
along the pasture,
because you will be safer thus,
in doing the sweet thing."

"Sir, yes, but, according to right,
the fool seeks his foolishness,
the courteous a courteous adventure,
and the peasant another peasant!
It is a place despoiled of wisdom
where one doesn't observe moderation:
so say the wise people of yore."

"Girl, your face
is the most mischievous I've ever seen
and your heart the most mocking."

"Sir, an owl brings you bad luck,
for, while one gapes in front of a picture,
another awaits the manna."

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